Homemade DIY Grain Bin Part 3

Homemade DIY Grain Bin Part 3

Homemade DIY Grain Bin Part 3

So this is pretty much our most recent review and assessment of our Homemade DIY Grain Bin build. The bins are working out really well for us so far. Given that we really need something movable, off the ground, and that wasn’t overly expensive, these things are doing great. They were cheap to build and are plenty rugged enough for our operation. With two people pushing the bins they move super easy.

Right now we have around 1500lbs in each bin. They are tough to get moving. Once you get them rolling though they move just fine. One of our plans is to get a some sidewalls built to allow a full 2000lbs in one bin. Stay tuned for that update in the future.

Most of the building materials we had on hand other than the casters. If you were to build brand new you would be looking at about $300 or so in lumber, casters, and hardware. Not too bad for the small homestead looking to save on feed costs.

Problems with Our Homemade DIY Grain Bin

Everything hasn’t worked out completely perfectly. We were able to build very cheaply and quickly. That was a huge plus. The biggest downside is the floor area the bins take up. With both pasture raised poultry and pasture raised pork that need grain we need a lot of bins. We can move them around okay, but long term we’ll eventually want to move towards a fixed unit that better utilizes vertical space. Then I can have my barn floor space back.

We had a feeling that mice and rats would eventually be a problem. They haven’t been an issue yet. Our biggest unforeseen problem has been our rogue laying hens. It’s not uncommon to go through the barn on an task and catch the little biddies inside ether grain filling their crops to their hearts content. Little rascals. Right now we have scrap pieces of plywood keeping them out. It won’t be enough to deter the rats and mice or squirrels long term though. Keep an eye out for update sin the future.

The side walls are also not quite high enough to support a full ton of feed. That’s our goal. We’ll build some removal sidewalls in the future and post more as time goes on. Overall, of now the bins are working great and sure beat the hell out of using barrels and handling feed twice. For the cost and time involved, it’s well worth it. If you’ve built something similar, or see a way to improve on what we’ve done share it below so everyone can benefit!

In case you missed it, see Part 2 here!

 

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